A description of the birthmark as nothing in this world is perfect

Page Number and Citation: Aylmer appeared to believe that, by the plainest scientific logic, it was altogether within the limits of possibility to discover this long-sought medium; "but," he added, "a philosopher who should go deep enough to acquire the power would attain too lofty a wisdom to stoop to the exercise of it. He more than intimated that it was at his option to concoct a liquid that should prolong life for years, perhaps interminably; but that it would produce a discord in Nature which all the world, and chiefly the quaffer of the immortal nostrum, would find cause to curse.

A description of the birthmark as nothing in this world is perfect

February 8, at 1: I believe the moral of this story is that man cannot play God. And now it is like the faintest rose color. The lightest flush of blood across her cheek would overcome it.

But she is so pale! Unfortunately the side effect of the antidote was her death. The birthmark was one of the things that made Georgiana who she was. Everyone has something about themselves they may not like and may want to fix.

This usually leads to surgery or any other type of procedure that will fix your insecurities. If you try to fix something about yourself, anything you do will have its consequences and unfortunately for Aylmer, his price was the women he loved the most.

Aylmer, dearest Aylmer, I am dying! He had expected her to be the most beautiful women that ever existed, and when she was, she could no longer exist. Nudrat Chaudhary February 8, at 2: Aylmer was a scientist and Aminadab was his underworker. The writer Hawthrone beautifully explains the difference between them.

Hawthrone showed that though Aylmer was better in looks as compared to Aminadab, what make them different are not only their looks but also their thinking. He wanted everything perfect no matter what would be the consequences. I think the moral of the story is that what God has created is perfect and if we try to change it we end up messing everything we are blessed with, as Alymer lost his wife.

And also anyone can be wise. The reader learns that Alymur has the need to change and have control over everything.

The Birthmark by Nathaniel Hawthorne

He is constantly seeking perfection but in reality nothing is perfect. This shows that even when trying to change something or trying to perfect things, you can make things worse.Aminadab is attracted to Georgiana's birthmark precisely because it isn't perfect, just as nothing in nature is "perfect." Aylmer, on the other hand, despises the birthmark for exactly these reasons and aspires to control and manipulate the material world in order to reach a higher state of spiritual perfection by removing the birthmark.

A description of the birthmark as nothing in this world is perfect

Apr 17,  · Aylmer, the protagonist of Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark,” undertakes to remove the blemish from his wife’s cheek to satisfy his own spiritual strivings and to redeem what he sees as a failed career.4/5(3). LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Birthmark, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

the birthmark essays Nothing in this world is perfect. Our flaws are what make us the beautiful and unique people that we are. They give us our personality, and allow us to stand out from the crowd.

The Birthmark by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The moment the birthmark disappears and she becomes perfect, she can no longer exist as a human—humans being, by Biblical definition, imperfect—so she dies to ascend to a higher plane of existence. Although Aylmer desires nothing more than for Georgiana to lose her birthmark and become perfect, he himself is quite imperfect.

The moment the birthmark disappears and she becomes perfect, she can no longer exist as a human—humans being, by Biblical definition, imperfect—so she dies to ascend to a higher plane of existence. Although Aylmer desires nothing more than for Georgiana to lose her birthmark and become perfect, he himself is quite imperfect.

Hawthorne's "The Birthmark" - Lesson Plan